My conversation with Daisy “#AndImaMormon” Chou on 4/23/12

You’ve seen the ads. They usually pop up right before the YouTube video of your friend’s baby saying, “kitty,” or, in my case, some Super Mario/Star Trek/Star Wars mash-up video. They start off pleasant enough. They’re of some normal-looking, everyday person, someone who could work with you, who could live right down the street. They talk about their normal days, their normal jobs, their normal families. It’s not nutty or crazy or chalk-full-of-made-up-bullshit at all.

Then it comes. “And I’m a Mormon.”

You’ve just been brain-raped. You thought you were gonna see some pleasant, slightly annoying, but ultimately inoffensive ad for home insurance or laundry detergent, or, worse, the latest E! reality show glorifying some famous-because-they’re-famous flavor-of-the-month celebrity.

But no.

You’ve been lulled, through Americana stereotypes, to consider, even if only for a second, that Mormons are JUST LIKE YOU! And hey, if they’re JUST LIKE YOU, then they can’t be too nutty, can they? Sure they wear magic underwear. Sure they overwhelmingly supported the legislation to strip gays of their civil rights in California in ’08, but they’re not a pack of dicks. They’re Susie, who works with you in accounts receivable. Or Dave, who’s kid plays softball with your kid. Or maybe even Chuck, your X-Box Live acquaintance who occasionally and handily whoops you at multi-player in the latest Halo incarnation.

Or Daisy.

Daisy’s not white. Daisy’s not a guy. Daisy’s not wearing that preppie shirt-and-tie-and-pants. Daisy’s not the stereotypical white (male) Mormon. She’s JUST LIKE YOU! And if that’s the case, then the LDS church can’t be all that bad, can it?

After I wrote about Daisy here, she contacted me. And here’s what she had to say to me (I’m in italics, she’s in bold, and other stuff is in italics bold):

I’m so flattered that you took the time to come to my lil old blog.

You’re welcome. You did say you were a “dedicated” blogger, so I figured I’d check out your dedicated blog.

Lil ol me, convert who became Momo for her hottie husband.

Notice I did say “presumed.” I obviously was and am not privy to the specific reasons why you became a Mormon.

Right… cuz I couldn’t find any hot and decent guys before he came along.

I never said that.

Right… cuz I am anti-social,

Never said that either.

weird blogger who decided she would give up her raging party and alcohol filled lifestyle

Or that.

to dedicate her life to becoming better, more patient, not cuss, not be vulgar, to go to Church on Sundays for three hours, to make promises to a God that I believes exists and gave His Son for me to be.

Are you suggesting that in order to dedicate one’s life to becoming a better, more patient person, one must become not only a Christian, but specifically a Mormon? I ask because I’ve never had this “raging party and alcohol filled lifestyle” and I’m just a little ol’ atheist. I’m not saying that there are no detrimental effects of alcohol. Maybe you had less control over your behavior with it than people like me. But the implication would have to be demonstrated that problems with your former lifestyle were solved directly and only by your conversion. And hey, the notion that dedicating one’s life to something that is not drinking can be a good thing, certainly, but I’d challenge you to prove that Christianity in general and Mormonism in specific have any objectively verifiable evidence of transforming lives solely by their own merits, not in addition to other factors.

As for your choice to go to church for three hours, make promises to God, and believe that He exists and gave his Son for you, it all begs the question I initially asked, which is how did you arrive at that conclusion?

Right. How could I not realize that?! I better hope my marriage lasts cuz if it doesn’t.. and you’re right.. I’m definitely screwed!

Well, your marriage ending would obviously be difficult, but you’d be able to move on as millions before you have.

Thanks for pointing that out to me. Good thing I’m Asian and submissive too, right? THANK YOU!

Never said anything about you being submissive.

LOL. You seriously crack me up.

You too. 🙂

By the way, I started investigating the Church way before I met my husband hottie, I was going to get baptized when I was two lessons in but felt my logical side (and former agnostic beliefs) tell me to take it slowly…. and my hottie had a missionary (another hottie believe it or not) when I met him… and we didn’t date until after I had been a member for a few months.

Cool, so I was wrong in my presumption. That’s why I called it a presumption. But that still doesn’t answer why you chose to join the church. And that was my question.

But even if I had converted for him (which a lot of girls do and by golly, if they feel the Spirit and they have a testimony, who are we to judge?!..

I guess it depends what we’re judging. If someone chooses to dedicate her life to a religion, which makes absolute claims of the nature of reality with zero evidence to back up those claims, because she’s marrying a boy, I’d say that’s pretty dumb. The two have nothing to do with each other. One is a religion and one is a relationship, and while the two can be and often are linked, the love of a partner is irrelevant to the validity of the claims of a religion.

That having been said, the choice to marry a boy and join his religion is obviously that of the girl and her choice is hers alone and I have no right to vilify the simple fact that she has that choice and she’s exercised it how she sees fit. But by that same token, I have identical moral obligations with drinkers, smokers, and drug abusers. If the person chooses to do something, fully aware of the inherent risks, and his actions don’t harm others, then have at it.

and if they don’t and they go inactive or whatever, it’s their choice!

I agree! 🙂

who are we to say oh my goodness Becky, can you believe she got baptized so she could get marry?

Hypothetically, we’re Becky’s friends and acquaintances and so have the right to feel concern for Becky, but beyond that, I agree that we have no right to interfere.

a lot of girls do way worse)….hehe.

That’s absolutely true.

Anyway… I stopped by to point out that what we Mormons, or members of the Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints believe ….is not exactly the religion I would have “converted” for a man in order to get married.

I understand. Thus, my question as to why you’d join.

Why? Umm… check out what we believe at Mormon.org and how we live by our faith..

Am I to understand that you’ve voluntarily put your face, name, and details of your life out there, proudly proclaiming that you’re a Mormon, claiming that the reason you became so is because you decided it was true, but when asked how you arrived at your conclusion, you’re just going to re-direct me to the official Mormon site? Why don’t you just answer the question? Presumably, you’ve voluntarily exposed yourself to the internet because you have an interest in attracting new members to the church, and yet when we ask you why you joined the club, you do a bait and switch? Why, then, have you lent yourself to the church to begin with?

I actually know quite a bit about the church as I was once involved with a (recovering) Mormon. She confirmed such beliefs as posthumous baptism and blessed underwear. Since she grew up in the church, as did your husband, I consider her experience authoritative on the matter.

But what the hey, I’ll give the site a look. Statement of faith #7 is interesting:

We believe in the gift of tongues, prophecy, revelation, visions, healing, interpretation of tongues, and so forth.

I like how vague it ends its list, “and so forth.” So you believe in glossolalia? If so, are you aware that this phenomenon has been tested and revealed to not be any actual form of language, but rather merely a facade? How about healing? Do you believe that one can be healed of any malady through prayer alone? If so, this has also been demonstrated to be false.

I find statements 12 and 13 interesting as well, as the church seems to have countered those, specifically in its support of California’s Proposition 8 in 2008, specifically endorsed by the President.

We believe in being subject to kings, presidents, rulers, and magistrates, in obeying, honoring, and sustaining the law.

Nothing in that one about changing the current law to reflect your personal beliefs.

We believe in being honest, true, chaste, benevolent, virtuous, and in doing good to all men; indeed, we may say that we follow the admonition of Paul-We believe all things, we hope all things, we have endured many things, and hope to be able to endure all things. If there is anything virtuous, lovely, or of good report or praiseworthy, we seek after these things.

Nothing in there about attempting to legislate your morality to prevent consenting, law-abiding, same-sex adults from petitioning the state to recognize their relationships.

I don’t understand the merit of “live by [your] faith.” Chabad-Lubavich Jews and al Qaeda Muslims also live by their respective faiths. Yet the former are exceedingly sexist and homophobic in theory and in practice, and the latter have an over-eager interest in building demolitions. So clearly, living by faith isn’t by itself an inherently good thing.

And really, what is up with believing in the devil? You don’t honestly think there’s a guy in a red body suit with horns, a pitchfork, and a Clark Gabel mustache.

it’s not easy bro!

I never claimed that being a Mormon was easy. I also fail to see the notion of following a difficult faith as deserving of respect. No one forced you to. You chose to. Why should you then be praised or respected for doing so?

It would have been much easier to stick to my ways and become some religious INSERT HERE that would not have encouraged me to change so much.

Are you suggesting that encouragement of change alone is worthy of conversion? If you are, then let me point out that all faiths are predicated on the premise that humans are inherently flawed and the faiths in question are the sole means by which humans can possibly rectify those flaws.

But hey, the changes have been blessings and I am loving it!

Obviously. I doubt you’d still be a Mormon if this weren’t the case. But I wonder, what, specifically, do you love about it? Is it the recorded history of fraud Joseph Smith’s inventing the religion out of thin air? Is it the inspired, but absurd after-life promises of its adherents eventually becoming gods of their own worlds?

Just some food for thought. Thanks for stopping by my blog, come by whenever. Take care and have a great weekend!

Thanks! And feel free to answer my initial question whenever you like. What convinced you that LDS is correct?

Best,

Anton.

I’m of course sending her the link to this post. We’ll see what she says.

3 Responses to “My conversation with Daisy “#AndImaMormon” Chou on 4/23/12”

  1. Christine Says:

    She does NOT sound educated at all, as stated. Let down..

    • Anton A. Hill Says:

      Hey Christine,

      Yeah, sorry about that. 🙂 She never wrote back either. So much for courage of her convictions. Love how she plasters herself all over YouTube for the church, but when we ask about that same church, she turns tail.

      Best,

      Anton.

  2. […] I got a little older, I learned that some sects, like Pentecostals (and Mormons), took the whole thing seriously, and that the odd sounds they made were that language. Examples […]

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